BrowseTheStacks

Aug 27

driveintheaterofthemind:

Roxy Richter And Ramona Flowers

Cosplay by ghostbread And yukapants

Photography by EmzonePhotography

driveintheaterofthemind:

Roxy Richter And Ramona Flowers

Cosplay by ghostbread And yukapants

Photography by EmzonePhotography

Ginger Ale or Mary Ann Ale?

brianmichaelbendis:

Ra’s Al Ghul by Mike Mignola

brianmichaelbendis:

Ra’s Al Ghul by Mike Mignola

(Source: redcell6, via lnsflrs)

Dark Phoenix by Chris Samnee

Dark Phoenix by Chris Samnee

driveintheaterofthemind:

Vintage Magazine - TV-Radio Life with Space Patrol

driveintheaterofthemind:

Vintage Magazine - TV-Radio Life with Space Patrol

driveintheaterofthemind:

Wonder Woman (1974)

Wonder Woman (Cathy Lee Crosby)

driveintheaterofthemind:

Wonder Woman (1974)

Wonder Woman (Cathy Lee Crosby)

[video]

driveintheaterofthemind:

Green Hornet (1940)

Green Hornet (Gordon Jones)

driveintheaterofthemind:

Green Hornet (1940)

Green Hornet (Gordon Jones)

The Thing by Moebius

The Thing by Moebius

For Joe Sinnott On His 80th Birthday by Terry Austin

For Joe Sinnott On His 80th Birthday by Terry Austin

thechronologicalsuperman:

Superman vol.1 #30 - Cover date September-October 1944
Lois stars in her third solo installment, and features prominently in the opening story to this issue (which involves Superman and Clark Kent switching roles, or at least pretending to, for Jimmy’s and Lois’ benefits), followed by Superman helping set a rightful heir to a foreign throne back in charge of the country which was stolen from his ancestor.
More importantly than any of these, though, is the comic book debut of Mr.Mxyztplk, and - unlike his newspaper appearance - this story focuses entirely on his peculiar brand of mischief.
Fans of the animated Superman series from the 1990s will recognize some of the elements of the story, from Mxyztplk’s bulb-headed, purple-suited appearance to his faking death after a truck collision and, of course, loudly awakening the forgetful “McGurk” (actually the famous Rodin statue The Thinker) at a Metropolis museum.
The incredibly popular imp causes a number of ruckuses around the city, engages Superman in a super-breath contest - not something that happens every day - and eventually laughs himself right back to the magical dimension of Zrrrf - for a short while, anyway, as he quickly proves to be one of Superman’s most popular foes.

thechronologicalsuperman:

Superman vol.1 #30 - Cover date September-October 1944

Lois stars in her third solo installment, and features prominently in the opening story to this issue (which involves Superman and Clark Kent switching roles, or at least pretending to, for Jimmy’s and Lois’ benefits), followed by Superman helping set a rightful heir to a foreign throne back in charge of the country which was stolen from his ancestor.

More importantly than any of these, though, is the comic book debut of Mr.Mxyztplk, and - unlike his newspaper appearance - this story focuses entirely on his peculiar brand of mischief.

Fans of the animated Superman series from the 1990s will recognize some of the elements of the story, from Mxyztplk’s bulb-headed, purple-suited appearance to his faking death after a truck collision and, of course, loudly awakening the forgetful “McGurk” (actually the famous Rodin statue The Thinker) at a Metropolis museum.

The incredibly popular imp causes a number of ruckuses around the city, engages Superman in a super-breath contest - not something that happens every day - and eventually laughs himself right back to the magical dimension of Zrrrf - for a short while, anyway, as he quickly proves to be one of Superman’s most popular foes.

(via yellowkryptonite)

[video]

dropboxofcuriosities:

Appearing vexed about ‘sharing’ his milk with pet rabbit Lazarus, Bobby Schilingloff got fresh carton after his was ‘milknapped’ during classroom nutrition break, 1969.

dropboxofcuriosities:

Appearing vexed about ‘sharing’ his milk with pet rabbit Lazarus, Bobby Schilingloff got fresh carton after his was ‘milknapped’ during classroom nutrition break, 1969.

rejectedprincesses:

Next Rejected Princess for you all: Pasiphaë, mythological Greek queen. Pasiphaë is best known for two things. The first, and better known of the two, was that she had an insatiable need to have sex with a bull. Not just any bull, but a bull that Poseidon gave her husband, king Minos. So the legend goes, her husband was supposed to sacrifice the bull back to Poseidon, but decided to keep it. In response, Poseidon was like, “Hey Pasiphaë, you know what’d be real good right now? Bull penis.” So she had the court inventor, Daedalus, build her a hollowed-out wooden cow so that she could have sex with the bull. She later gave birth to the Minotaur. Daedalus got busy building a labyrinth. The second thing she was well-known for was ruining her husband’s sex life. Being a powerful sorceress (her sister was Circe) and knowing that her husband was cheating on her, she made a charm such that if he slept with anyone save her, he would ejaculate serpents, scorpions, and millipedes. Gross.Now, here’s where it gets weird. Her husband’s mother, Europa (after whom Europe itself is named), had almost the exact same story. In her story, Zeus took the form of a beautiful bull, approached her, carried her out to an island in the ocean, and mated with her. She then had three kids, one of whom was king Minos - Pasiphaë’s husband. Notably Europa’s tale didn’t have the whole arachnid-semen part of the story. So what’s the deal? As best as historians are able to determine, they were the same legend. Europa was the Minoan version, and Pasiphaë the Greek one. When the Greeks rolled through and conquered Crete, they essentially rewrote things. Instead of her being a powerful and in-charge woman, she was a depraved and lustful pawn. Their way of breaking Minoan traditions and bending it to their own ends. Dick move, guys. Artistic notes: 
Her laurel garland makes two horns (she was often depicted with a horned crown, being a bull goddess). 
The night sky in the background is the Taurus constellation, naturally. 
The setting is a direct copy of king Minos’s palace at Knossos (which really exists). 
The cow is modeled after a native breed local to that region called the Greek shorthair. 
The only severe inaccuracy I’m aware of is that the cow was supposed to be on wheels - probably a reference to an actual statue that the ancient Minoans used.  I liked it better with hooves though.
Oh, and the lady in the background is wiping scorpions off her chest and there are some in her hair. Make of that what you will.

EDITS: an earlier version of this post referred to ancient Crete as Minoa — how embarrassing! Thanks to bachvevo for the correction!

rejectedprincesses:

Next Rejected Princess for you all: Pasiphaë, mythological Greek queen. 

Pasiphaë is best known for two things. The first, and better known of the two, was that she had an insatiable need to have sex with a bull. Not just any bull, but a bull that Poseidon gave her husband, king Minos. So the legend goes, her husband was supposed to sacrifice the bull back to Poseidon, but decided to keep it. In response, Poseidon was like, “Hey Pasiphaë, you know what’d be real good right now? Bull penis.” So she had the court inventor, Daedalus, build her a hollowed-out wooden cow so that she could have sex with the bull. 

She later gave birth to the Minotaur. Daedalus got busy building a labyrinth. 

The second thing she was well-known for was ruining her husband’s sex life. Being a powerful sorceress (her sister was Circe) and knowing that her husband was cheating on her, she made a charm such that if he slept with anyone save her, he would ejaculate serpents, scorpions, and millipedes. Gross.

Now, here’s where it gets weird. Her husband’s mother, Europa (after whom Europe itself is named), had almost the exact same story. In her story, Zeus took the form of a beautiful bull, approached her, carried her out to an island in the ocean, and mated with her. She then had three kids, one of whom was king Minos - Pasiphaë’s husband. Notably Europa’s tale didn’t have the whole arachnid-semen part of the story. 

So what’s the deal? As best as historians are able to determine, they were the same legend. Europa was the Minoan version, and Pasiphaë the Greek one. When the Greeks rolled through and conquered Crete, they essentially rewrote things. Instead of her being a powerful and in-charge woman, she was a depraved and lustful pawn. Their way of breaking Minoan traditions and bending it to their own ends. Dick move, guys. 

Artistic notes:


Oh, and the lady in the background is wiping scorpions off her chest and there are some in her hair. Make of that what you will.

EDITS: an earlier version of this post referred to ancient Crete as Minoa — how embarrassing! Thanks to bachvevo for the correction!

thehauntedrocket:

sf by Xhui 9

thehauntedrocket:

sf by Xhui 9